Sep 18, 2008 HN Honduras

I’m nearly a full fledged fellow, simply waiting a few more intense sessions and a final knighting. Once all that formality is over, it will be a whirlwind two months while I sell everything I own, say goodbye to friends, family and co-workers, stuff myself full of vaccinations and purchase the ticket to begin my new life in Tegucigalpa, Honduras as a Kiva Fellow!

Training highlights have been really inspiring conversations with Matt and Premal (and yes, I do have a crush on him now). Its wonderful to be a part of this great organization! Please tune in…

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Sep 18, 2008

Hi my name is Ashley and I am a Kiva Fellow in class KF6.

I do have to say that I am jealous of my Kiva Fellows peers who know where they are going and with whom they will be working with, but I know that fate (a.ka. Michelle my Kiva manager) has something great in store for me! I am not leaving til January, but am getting antsy to leave already.

Training has been especially inspiring. The Kiva staff has been incredibly welcoming, and there is no other place I would want to be than right here in San Francisco working for such an amazing non-profit!

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Sep 18, 2008

That should be the sign hanging underneath every blog because, really, blogs are like an open invitation to read your diary.

Lucky for me, my diary is written to an imaginary audience populated by people just like you.

Welcome.  Welcome to my first post as a Kiva Fellow.  I hope that these first few sentences prove enticing enough to read to the middle and even the end of this entry. 

This fall I will be going to Peru and later Bolivia to help act as a bridge between the Kiva borrowers from EDAPROSPO and Emprender (respectively) and their Kiva lenders around the world...

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Sep 18, 2008

Hi, my name is Evie, and I’m a Kiva Fellow.  (Say it with me now: “Hi, Evie!”)  

From October 1, 2008 through October 1, 2009 I will be in the field as a Kiva Fellow.  I sit now in the Kiva office in San Francisco, training with my colleagues who will be scattered around the globe for the coming months.  In two weeks I’ll leave Seattle for three months in Kiev with HOPE Ukraine.  From there I’ll head east into Central Asia for the next three months, and then on to Cambodia for six months, before landing back in the USA next year.

As the year...

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Sep 18, 2008

We are in Day 4 of our Kiva Fellowship training in San Francisco. We’ve gathered from all over the US to prepare for our 3+ month stints across Africa, Asia, South America and Central Europe. Really the most amazing moment for me here has been meeting and communing with 30 other people who are about to deploy across the world. It’s a great and inspirational feeling to realize you’re sitting in a discussion group with seven eager and excited people- one about to fly off to Cambodia, another to Nicaragua, another to Bali, or to Tanzania, or to Azerbaijan… the list...

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Sep 18, 2008 TZ Tanzania

Dala-dalas are Dar es Salaam’s form of public transportation. They are buses that run all over the city, charging about $0.30 per ride. There is no set schedule, and they typically only leave once they are full.

Although several Tanzanians warned me about taking dala-dalas during rush hour, I figured it was no big deal. So I would be squished and sweaty, but it’s nothing I can’t handle. I took one from work to the city center and I even got a seat! At that point I was thinking, “Why did everyone make such a big deal? This is totally fine...

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Sep 17, 2008 TZ Tanzania

(To see what happened during the first 11 days, see Part 1)

Day 12 (Warning: slightly disgusting content. Do not attempt to read while eating): I just finished rubbing my heels with sandpaper for the last hour. It’s a long story how I got to this point, but it involves exclusively flip-flops/sandals and very dirty/dusty/sandy roads for 6 weeks. Basically, I gave up trying to wash or in any way care for my feet a few weeks ago. They were just always dirty. Even when I get home there’s just dirt everywhere so I gave up on my feet. The plan worked out fine until yesterday my...

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Sep 11, 2008 CM Cameroon

One of the most inspiring things I have seen in Cameroon is the progress made by many GHAPE borrowers over the years. GHAPE is the local NGO where I am working during my time as a Kiva Fellow in West Africa. Their aim, like many of the other hundreds of microfinance organisations around the world, is to combat poverty by bringing capital to people who have none. GHAPE sow these funds with a good handful of business advice to ensure their borrowers’ ventures grow tall.

I spent my second week visiting the small town of...

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Sep 9, 2008 KE Kenya

It has been sometime since I’ve updated for the Kiva Fellows blog. As cliché as it is lots has happened and I’ve promised a more in depth description of the impact of the post-election crisis on micro-finance. So in baseball terminology I offer a double header (or double-dip in the vernacular of the dugout). I wanted to separate the entries. This one is about my field partner. Below is an entry more specific to the violence and its impact on three remarkable women. I’ve been in Africa for two months and I thought I’d finally share more about my field partner, Opportunity International...

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Sep 9, 2008 KE Kenya

The last several weeks I’ve been traveling all over West Kenya visiting groups in the branch offices of OI-Wedco to do journal updates. I return back to Kisumu with a deeply somber heart. A few weeks ago in Kakemega I met two Kikuyu single mothers from a Kiva funded group. They told me about how they lost everything after the post-election violence. During the turmoil their shop and clothing stock was burned because of their tribal background. They fled to an IDP (internally displaced persons, essentially refugees in their own country) camp run by the UN and stayed for five months. They...

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