Stories tagged with agriculture

Nov 11, 2014 PY Paraguay
So we've all been there. At least I have. I'm starting up the Kiva website to go look for a new borrower to support. I might click on one of the pictures right on the homepage, because something catches my attention. A smile, an animal that snuck onto the image, a background that looks intriguing. But I'd quickly get on to the filters, and the first one I check is always the same: only show me loans of women borrowers. How discriminatory, right? So like I said, I'm guilty of the same crime, but instead of just arguing with gender equality, let me give you two good reasons to support a...
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Jun 6, 2014 US United States

 
If you ever get the chance to visit Richmond, you will most likely spend some time in an area called Carytown. Strolling down West Cary Street you can linger at restaurants, and shop in one of the many locally owned establishments on the street. You will also see not one, not two, and not even three, but four grocery stores all within a few blocks of one another. There is certainly no shortage of access to fresh food in this area.

Other areas of Richmond aren’t as... Continue Reading >>
May 5, 2014 UG Uganda
John Bosco and me in his farm as he proudly holds up his Kiva Profile

Sitting across from John Bosco in the living room of his modest home in rural Uganda, I smiled as he introduced me to his two youngest children. He then told me how he’d used his Kiva loan to purchase fertilizer and a pesticide spray pump to improve his farm. When I asked him if he had any other sources of income he beamed proudly before reviewing his businesses: poultry, pigs, a fish pond, goat trading, and plantain and coffee farming.
... Continue Reading >>
May 5, 2014 UG Uganda
Visiting Vian in rural Uganda took us over questionable roads through what was once forest land.

Surrounding the lopsided, mangled dirt road was a verdant landscape of densely packed farmland. Maize filled one line of sight before giving way to plantain trees, which in turn were followed by beans, or sweet potatoes, and the occasional wetland with overgrown grass. The long visible stretch to the horizon though pointed out the relative absence of trees to interrupt the view. The driver, while navigating cavernous... Continue Reading >>
May 5, 2014 GO Global Update
Before coming to Isebania, Kenya, I knew little of the daily struggles of a smallholder farmer in the developing world. How his or her year could be determined by the whims of the weather. In Isebania, there are no irrigation systems, and farmers plan their lives around two rainfall seasons—the “long rains” from February to July and the “short rains” from October to December.

For the majority of families in Isebania and the larger region of Kuria West, it is the outcome of these harvest seasons that determine how much food will be on the table, if school fees can be paid, and if... Continue Reading >>
Oct 10, 2013 GO Global Update

When I first learned of the possibility of a fellowship with Kiva, my mind raced with visions of exotic food stalls on bustling streets, colorful people conversing in strange tongues and moped rides through pastoral countryside to conduct borrower verifications.

So, when I learned that Kiva wanted me to work, here, in my adopted city of San Francisco, I was a little hesitant at first. Then I heard about this innovative program called Kiva Zip, which had the potential, quite literally, to revolutionize micro-lending across the world. This was a chance to... Continue Reading >>
Sep 9, 2013 KE Kenya
As I sank into the plush seat on the overnight bus toward the Kenyan coast for the first time, I let out a sigh of relief. Nairobi, aptly dubbed “Nairobbery” by locals and expats for the high number of muggings, break-ins, and carjackings, was starting to wear me out.
 
“The coast is different,” my regular taxi driver had told me. “People aren’t as stressed out, and they enjoy life.”
 
It was true. Maybe it was the lingering humidity or the pristine beaches, but people sauntered through the streets in Mombasa as though to fill the senses with the salty air... Continue Reading >>
Jul 7, 2013 CR Costa Rica
I'm a vegetarian. However, there are occasionally times when I relent and consume meat, especially if it's offered and refusal means either going hungry or—worse—being rude. Even this reluctant acceptance of the occasional meaty meal has its limits, though.

I will not eat pork. It's not a religious thing for me, nor is it a question of taste; I think bacon tastes fantastic and is a wondrous smell in the morning, particularly maple-cured smoked bacon, eagerly sizzling in the pan as the coffee brews. This is the smell that mornings are made of, that makes... Continue Reading >>
Jul 7, 2013 US United States
Shaun Winter with his Hot Winter hot sauce


Portland, Oregon: where the dream of the 90s is still alive. Where you can put a bird on something and call it art. Where 20-somethings go to retire.
 
What’s funny about these stereotypes (thanks to Portlandia) is how very pervasive they have become in our every-day lingo. Friends in my immediate circle reference Portlandia more than any other show, not only because it’s funny, but because I think people really identify with it.... Continue Reading >>
Jul 7, 2013 PE Peru
Alright, you caught me. No rivers were forded, nor were any woods traversed. Mostly dirt roads were traveled on and hillsides were (carefully) climbed.

Life in Peru has been wonderfully intense, exciting, tiring, and challenging over the last few weeks. I am not going to dwell on the awesome ceviche and seafood I have been fortunate enough to eat. Nor will I say much about the recent 5.1 earthquake that originated 50 miles off the coast of Lima (or 4.6, depending on where you get your earthquake news from).

...
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