Stories tagged with All

Feb 2, 2009 HN Honduras

Yesterday all the loan officers and agency coordinators from all over Honduras gathered in the small conference room in Prisma’s main office summarize, discuss and clarify the way Kiva would be implemented in the coming year. This was the final day and our final hurrah. I was so honored that they considered my assistance and their partnership with Kiva worth the administrative cost of bringing everyone together for a day- effectively halting all normal activity. The loan officers from San Lorenzo and Choluteca were up at 3 in the morning to catch the bus to the capital and surely didn’t...

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Feb 2, 2009 PH Philippines

I really struggled for a catchy title on this post but failed miserably.  Hang in there – I promise it gets better.

One of the nagging questions I’ve always had about microfinance is – how does it scale?  It’s particularly relevant here in the Philippines where Community Economic Venture’s (CEV) maximum loan is $450.  A typical loan officer has about 350 clients who are often scattered across the countryside down dirt roads in distant communities.  On a recent trip to Mindanao I had an opportunity to find out the nuts and bolts of how your dollars reach...

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Feb 2, 2009 PH Philippines

I really struggled for a catchy title on this post but failed miserably.  Hang in there – I promise it gets better.

One of the nagging questions I’ve always had about microfinance is – how does it scale?  It’s particularly relevant here in the Philippines where Community Economic Venture’s (CEV) maximum loan is $450.  A typical loan officer has about 350 clients who are often scattered across the countryside down dirt roads in distant communities.  On a recent trip to Mindanao I had an opportunity to find out the nuts and bolts of how your dollars reach...

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Feb 2, 2009 PY Paraguay
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Kiva training is done. My bags are packed. I’m about as ready as I can be to make it from San Diego, to LAX, to Houston, to Buenos Aires, and then on to Asuncion, Paraguay.  So, here I am, ready to depart for another meet and greet with customs officials, and it seems appropriate to spend a little time thinking and sharing about why, exactly, I’ve decided to hit the road again.  On...

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Feb 2, 2009 TJ Tajikistan

Pamir Mountains - Photo by Oytun Orguil

When I set out to research Tajikistan a few months ago, I figured that it would be challenging but didn’t realize exactly how difficult it would be to find accurate, up-to-date information on this small, land-locked country in Central Asia.

Aside from a single chapter in a Central Asia guidebook by Lonely Planet and a few websites, there is relatively little information available for those interested in traveling to...

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Jan 1, 2009 DO Dominican Republic

After approximately a year of waiting I finally made it to my destination: the micro finance institute (MFI) Esperanza/Hope International located in balmy, beautiful Santo Domingo! Kalie Gold (another Kiva Fellow) and Analin (Kiva Coordinator) have been gracious enough to show me the ropes, and there is plenty to do. Right now we are currently working on designing a short training course for getting better profile pictures, more journal updates, getting documents sent on a timely manner, etc.

I was really excited to learn that Esperanza/Hope International are getting ready to launch...

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Jan 1, 2009 KH Cambodia

Like the windshield on a motor-taxi in Phnom Penh rush hour, transparency is vital to Kiva’s survival. To give interest-free loans, lenders deserve to know that every cent of their money is being distributed exactly as promised, whilst borrowers have the right not to be misrepresented.

An important aspect of this transparency, and one which Kiva takes very seriously, is the integrity of the data on its website. Allowing inaccurate data is the first step towards encouraging fraud on the site, which would have severe reputational consequences for Kiva.

A key data check is...

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Jan 1, 2009 DO Dominican Republic

Sweet December

My Dominican co-workers wore sweaters to work when temperature fell below 70 degrees in December. “Winter is cold here,” friends and employees told me. While I stuck to my t-shirts in the day, I did cut short my nightly unheated showers.

Mujeres Necesitades outside the Hato Mayor office: these bank members finished a loan in December and took out another, expecting that December would be a...

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Jan 1, 2009 KE Kenya

“Idhi tich?” Nelson, my compound’s askari (guard), asked as I made my way to the gate. “Adhi tich!” I replied with complete enthusiasm, slightly mangling the Dholuo phrase, but hoping that maybe, just maybe, today I had said it well enough to be understood.

With an encouraging, patient smile, Nelson had me repeat the phrase that explained I was going to work until it was intelligible to him, if not anyone else who might have to suffer the misfortune of hearing my rather hopeless, though enthusiastic, attempts to speak Dholuo.

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Jan 1, 2009 TG Togo

Three years ago, the streets I drive on today in downtown Lomé were ablaze with burning tires and barricades, as civilians protested the contested results of the presidential election. Gnassingbé Eyadéma, the longest ruling leader in Africa (second in the world only to Fidel Castro) had died on February 5, 2005. Two months later, an election pronounced his son, Faure Gnassingbé, the winner, defeating an opposition coalition of six parties.

...

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