Stories tagged with All

Nov 11, 2009 SL Sierra Leone

by Stephanie Meyer, KF9, Sierra Leone

I eat at Kumba’s at least three times a week. I’ve always been the type that likes to have my “regular spots” – my coffee shop, my bar, my newsstand. I like to think of Kumba’s as my lunch spot. It doesn’t hurt that everything is so homey. There are only three tables, so people tend to share and chat. By the time I had made three visits, I was granted to privilege of walking through the door to “Eh! Step-nie!” followed by enquiries after the folks I usually eat with and their whereabouts. The food is tasty and...

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Nov 11, 2009 BO Bolivia

By Suzy Marinkovich, KF8 Peru & KF9 Bolivia

Twisted twining vining metal unrhythmic untamed unkempt and in comes the dust sweat and sticking to me tires thumping each rock unsettled plastic bag squeezed empty tossed out the window just a drop of papaya juice leaps back clings to the dirty car door parting from the white stretch of plastic mangling on wire scraps whose posture, never organized nor structured nor retreating but insistingly unfinished uncared for undone and meters behind she rests her worn hand with dirty fingernails on the back...

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Nov 11, 2009 MX Mexico

By Julia Kastner, KF9 Mexico

When Kiva first started, all of its loans were to individuals.  Borrower A asked for X dollars and voila!  Person A got a Kiva loan.   Over time, however, Kiva’s been working with more and more MFIs, and the number of different types of loans and lending models has been increasing.

Watch a meeting of a community bank (a.k.a. UDE):

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As Kiva explains...

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Nov 11, 2009 KE Kenya

by Rachel Brooks, KF9, Kenya

My favorite Kiva field partner before I started my fellowship was Kisimu Medical & Education Trust, here in Kenya. At K-MET, microfinance is a smaller part of a community-based health organization. They offer loans to providers (many of them volunteers) so that they can maintain or improve their clinics and services. And they have these wonderfully innovative programs to help women and improve reproductive health.

But as much as programs like these make me go weak at the knees, I’ve also really come around to loving what the...

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Nov 11, 2009

By Mohammed Al-Shawaf, KF9 Palestine

Before proceeding, let me first state that this is not a political blog.  I neither have the expertise nor desire to engage in the complex web of conflict–latent or otherwise–that surrounds the major events of the last decade in Palestine.  I will attempt to reference and explain only the events that help me tell the story of the resiliency of the Palestinian microfinance sector and in particular, of Ryada.  I implore those interested in learning more to do just that.  Although it requires a bit of fiddling around, the ...

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Nov 11, 2009 NI Nicaragua

By Meg Gray, KF9 Nicaragua

It rained all weekend in Managua. It rained because of Tropical Storm/Hurricane Ida, which hit Nicaragua’s Atlantic coast on Thursday. You may have heard about Ida because your saw it on the news or read about it in the paper. Or maybe, like me, you learned about it via an alert from the US Embassy in Nicaragua. In my mind, Embassy Alerts are code for “things to start worrying about if you aren’t already.” Written in a calm, informative tone, the alerts are as alarming as they are pertinent. In my five weeks in Nicaragua, I have received alerts on...

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Nov 11, 2009 AM Armenia

By Brian Kelly, KF9, Armenia

Not very good, at least in some of these Armenian villages I’ve been dropping in on lately.  Have you smelled a chicken coop, or a sty filled with 20 pigs lately? It’s tough to carry a conversation in there.  Visiting borrowers, at least in Armenian villages is quite the sensory overload.  You will smell more than you hoped to, probably taste something you never expected to, and perhaps hear a story that will inspire you to start your own apricot grove.

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Nov 11, 2009 MX Mexico

By Julie Pachico, KF9 Mexico

A big part of the loan officers’ work load at FVP is “prospectando,” or heading out into the field and reaching out to potential clients. When I was first invited to come along I was a little nervous, as my career as a canvasser lasted for all of one day and I hate pushy sales people, no matter how good the cause. However my fears were rapidly relieved within minutes of accompanying the loan officers on their door-to-door visits. Their attitude isn’t that of aggressive marketing, but rather stems from a genuine concern and...

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Nov 11, 2009 EC Ecuador

By Kimia Raafat, KF9 Ecuador

Last week, I blogged about D-MIRO’s influence in the peri-urban zones of Guayaquil.  There is no way to describe the dedicated D-MIRO staff members and the lengths they go to reach those marginalized from the traditional financial system. So I opted to film a sample day! Here is “My Motorcycle Diary”:

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Fun...

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Nov 11, 2009 NI Nicaragua

By Victoria Kabak, KF9, Nicaragua

Before I left for my placement as a Kiva Fellow in Nicaragua, I was browsing my microfinance institution’s web site, trying to see what I could learn from it and to familiarize myself with the organization, AFODENIC, a bit more. I clicked on a link in the left sidebar called “Fuentes de Financiamiento,” or “Sources of Funding.” After the page loaded, I realized that, subconsciously and perhaps naïvely, I had been expecting to see a particular logo we know so well, that comforting, familiar green logo, with its...

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