Stories tagged with Tajikistan

Oct 10, 2011 KH Cambodia

Compiled by Kathrin Gerner, KF16, Rwanda

Six on a Motorbike in Cambodia (by Dave Weber)

This week on the Kiva fellows blog: Hop on a poda-poda or an okada to try out an adventurous way to get around Sierra Leone. Find out why loan use in Tajikistan is not as straightforward as you may think. Learn how the principle of “trust but verify” is applied in Georgia. Explore the clever efforts of an Ecuadorian Kiva partner to craft an agricultural loan...

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Oct 10, 2011 TJ Tajikistan

By Chris Paci, KF16, Tajikistan

For many Kiva lenders, loan use – or what an entrepreneur plans to do with the funds he or she receives – is their most important consideration in deciding which entrepreneurs to support. On the Kiva website, it’s the single most prominent piece of information supplied about any featured entrepreneur. Take a look at Muso, for example, a taxi driver from Tajikistan who has applied for Kiva funding through Kiva’s field partner IMON International. His loan use is stated just to the right of his picture – “To buy a car” – and expanded upon in his...

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Sep 9, 2011 TJ Tajikistan

By Chris Paci, KF16, Tajikistan

The valiant 4x4 that made the eight-hour trip from Dushanbe to Khujand.

Seeing a disheveled American with two huge suitcases standing by the side of the road, the taxi driver cuts the wheel, bombs horizontally across four (blessedly empty) lanes of traffic, and screeches to a stop in front of me. I open the passenger door and stuck my head inside. “To the Tsementzavod bus station, how much?” I rap out. He names a price. I counter. After...

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Dec 12, 2010 TJ Tajikistan

By Carrie Piesen, KF13, Tajikistan

As part of the application process for the Kiva Fellowship, prospective fellows have to submit a ranking of countries where they hope to be sent for their placement.  I’m sure Thailand, Samoa, and Costa Rica are lovely at this time of year, but there was little doubt in my mind as to which would be first on my list – what could be better than winter in Tajikistan?

This country has it all!  You want mountains?  They make up 93% of the country, making it one of the highest and most mountainous on earth.  Clear skies?...

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Nov 11, 2010 TJ Tajikistan

Microfinance has been featured extensively in the media recently – even making it on to an episode of The Simpsons, where a cartoon version of Muhammad Yunus, founder of Grameen Bank, provides financial advice to Lisa.  The real live version of Mr. Yunus also made headlines in an exchange at the Clinton Global Initiative with Vikram Akula, CEO of SKS, an Indian microfinance bank that raised over $350 million through an initial public offering (IPO) this past July.   The IPO fueled a debate within the microfinance community on governance structures, and whether microfinance organizations...

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Oct 10, 2010 TJ Tajikistan

The road going over the pass has drops down the side in which one can see the bodies of former semis, trucks, and cars which slid down the side of the road. The second time I took the road my driver told me, “That always happens in winter, but how else are you going to get goods from one place to another.” The main road linking Dushanbe (the capital) and Khujand (the second largest city) is interesting to say the least. Going over 9,000 feet at one point, and with parts of the road being dirt, or when it rains mud, this is the only internal artery that connects the two main...

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Oct 10, 2010 TJ Tajikistan

I never thought my Kiva Fellowship would deal so much with cotton, without actually dealing with cotton. Today one thing  Central Asia, especially Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan, are known for is cotton, if they are known at all (All make top 10 list of cotton exporters). In Tajikistan it is everywhere, with pictures of cotton and even statues of cotton, the state symbol also has cotton on it. Cotton has driven much of the history of Central Asia and Tajikistan. So one begins to wonder: how did cotton become such an important crop, and what has been its consequences?

In the...

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Oct 10, 2010 TJ Tajikistan

We often hear about the high transaction costs faced by Microfinance Institutions (MFIs), who are making small loans in challenging economic environments.  A few of my favorite past blog posts on this subject are from Meg Gray and James Allman-Gulino.

It’s also important to remember that when borrowers obtain a loan from an MFI, they face many of these same costs; including taking time out from work for meetings, and traveling rough roads to an MFI’s branch office to apply for a loan or make a repayment.  IMON International, one of Kiva’s Field Partners in Tajikistan, has recently...

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Sep 9, 2010 TJ Tajikistan

She looked at me very sternly, as if I had said something wrong. I knew that her students must be very obedient because she was arguably the most intimidating teacher I had met in a post-soviet country, and I had met a lot of them. Rosa, as she wanted me to call her, even though it wasn’t her name, was a teacher in a secondary school.

“You must, um, understand Sam,” she started out, as if trying to figure out how to word her sentences correctly in English, “Tajikistan today, is not all of the land of Tajiks. Samarkand and Bukhara are also part of the wider land of Tajiks.”

“...

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Sep 9, 2010 AZ Azerbaijan

“Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, those ripples build a current which can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.”- RFK

The first news reports on BBC, New York Times, and AP said that the bomb went off at 8:10 in the morning. I swear though, that I heard it at 8:04. It’s not every day that a young American not serving in the armed forces...

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